Jerry Seinfeld AMA

  • Dude on Reddit: Do you ever think of doing more with Seinfeld? I love the show and think a reunion episode or a sequel somehow would be amazing.
  • Jerry: I think you're wrong. I think it would be lame, and I think it would be an embarrassment to the nice place that the show occupies. I'm absolutely happy keeping it the way it is. You can't keep asking for more of certain things, you know? one of the keys to life is having a sense of proportion, knowing how long to sit at a restaurant after you've eaten, or how long you should go on vacation - if you go to Hawaii for a month on vacation, I guarantee you that by the end you'll hate it. So it's the same with a TV show, you want to do a certain amount of it, so that when people look back on it and they love it. I could have easily done the show for one or two or three more years, but it would have changed the way people look back at it. I think I made the right decision. Because people like the show now even more than they did in the 1990s, because it didn't get worn out.
fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.
In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.
The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.
The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.
In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 
(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.
In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.
The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.
The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.
In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 
(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.
In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.
The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.
The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.
In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 
(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.
In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.
The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.
The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.
In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 
(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 
Zoom Info

fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.

In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.

The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.

The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.

In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 

(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 

susiethemoderator:

susiethemoderator:

unapologetically-black:

Study finds: White children far more negative about interactions with different races than Black children.

Is anyone actually surprised though?

These are the children of the adults who were raised by the people who fought to keep Jim Crow alive. These children are being raised by the offspring of men and women who lynched black people for sitting on the wrong side of a restaurant; the very people who fought to keep segregation alive and killed Martin Luther King Jr.

So by all means, I doubt we needed a study to prove this fact true.

To add to the above argument:

Even if the child is raised in a household where race is NOT a topic of discussion the child will still pick up on Racial Micro Aggressions.

If you have never spoken ill of black men, yet you clutch your purse or lock your windows when one is around; your child will notice that and process “black men are dangerous”. If you discuss how you don’t like when people get tans and have darker skin your child will process “dark skin is ugly” and it doesn’t help that the mass media the child is watching also projects this notion that white is the standard of beauty and those who do not adhere are deemed ugly and unworthy. If you don’t associate with people of color or keep any relations short and brief?; your child will too.

Many parents fail to realize that their children are ALWAYS watching them, always. Just like baby ducks following their mama, a child follows it’s parents. It’s a survival tactic for a child to copy the adult and bring the caregivers characteristics into their own being.

You may think “oh he didn’t say anything” or “he’s playing he’s not listening to my conversation”; but he is. Which is why many people turn out like their parents or develop similar parenting styles.

this needs to be changed

jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info
jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’
In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 
Zoom Info

jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’

In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 

jcoleknowsbest:

arachnofiend:

chronically-rebellious:

tashabilities:

scorpysue:

thegabdonwrites:

liltranslady:

kittymanada:

student-for-an-anarchist-society:

does anyone even need to say anything more about israel?

You bet your sweet ass if China or Iran was doing this reporters would be able to find the word “sterilization,” which is conspicuously absent here.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Again. Israel!

:(

If you defend Israel, I don’t need to know you.

FORCED STERILIZATION IS NOT OKAY. Please signal boost so that people realize that forced sterilization wasn’t just something that happened in the US in the ’70s, but that it’s still going on now and it’s eugenics.

Here’s an article detailing the issue further

awww look…

jcoleknowsbest:

arachnofiend:

chronically-rebellious:

tashabilities:

scorpysue:

thegabdonwrites:

liltranslady:

kittymanada:

student-for-an-anarchist-society:

does anyone even need to say anything more about israel?

You bet your sweet ass if China or Iran was doing this reporters would be able to find the word “sterilization,” which is conspicuously absent here.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Again. Israel!

:(

If you defend Israel, I don’t need to know you.

FORCED STERILIZATION IS NOT OKAY. Please signal boost so that people realize that forced sterilization wasn’t just something that happened in the US in the ’70s, but that it’s still going on now and it’s eugenics.

Here’s an article detailing the issue further

awww look…